January 22, 2013

(Source: jaidefinichon, via scienceyoucanlove)

10:38pm
Filed under: science botany 
August 8, 2012
Painted lady #biology #science #nature (Taken with Instagram at Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)

Painted lady #biology #science #nature (Taken with Instagram at Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)

11:40am
Filed under: science biology nature 
March 27, 2012

Perpetual Ocean
This visualization shows ocean surface currents around the world during the period from June 2005 through Decmeber 2007.

Van Gogh-esque

(Source: Flickr / gsfc)

6:22pm
Filed under: science 
October 18, 2011

(Source: southstreetcollective)

11:28am
Filed under: science 
October 11, 2011

These images are part of a series of remarkable patterns that bacteria form when grown in a petri dish. The colony structures form as adaptive responses to laboratory-imposed stresses that mimic hostile environments faced in nature. (via)

(via geneticist)

1:35pm
Filed under: science 
September 13, 2011

Why are carrots orange? It is political


No, the image above does not some show some collection of freshly genetically designed hypercarrots in various colors of the rainbow. This is the spectrum of colors carrots used to have – and in some regions of the world you can still find white, yellow, red and purple carrots. In most countries however, carrots tend to be orange nowadays. Why is that?They’re orange for entirely political reasons: in the 17th century, Dutch growers cultivated orange carrots as a tribute to William of Orange – who led the the struggle for Dutch independence – and the color stuck. A thousand years of yellow, white and purple carrot history, was wiped out in a generation.Although some scholars doubt if orange carrots even existed prior to the 16th century, they now form the basis of most commercial cultivators around the world. Presumably crosses between Eastern (purple), Western (white, red) and perhaps wild carrots led to the formation of the orange rooted carrot sub species. Turkey is often cited as the original birthplace of the hybrids (or mutations) of the two groups.Whatever the origins, the Long Orange Dutch carrot, first described in writing in 1721, is the forebear of the orange Horn carrot varieties so abundant nowadays. The Horn Carrot derives from the Netherlands town of Hoorn in the neighborhood of which it was presumably bred. All our modern, western carrots ultimately descend from these varieties. Hypernature avant la lettre.

Why are carrots orange? It is political

No, the image above does not some show some collection of freshly genetically designed hypercarrots in various colors of the rainbow. This is the spectrum of colors carrots used to have – and in some regions of the world you can still find white, yellow, red and purple carrots. In most countries however, carrots tend to be orange nowadays. Why is that?

They’re orange for entirely political reasons: in the 17th century, Dutch growers cultivated orange carrots as a tribute to William of Orange – who led the the struggle for Dutch independence – and the color stuck. A thousand years of yellow, white and purple carrot history, was wiped out in a generation.

Although some scholars doubt if orange carrots even existed prior to the 16th century, they now form the basis of most commercial cultivators around the world. Presumably crosses between Eastern (purple), Western (white, red) and perhaps wild carrots led to the formation of the orange rooted carrot sub species. Turkey is often cited as the original birthplace of the hybrids (or mutations) of the two groups.

Whatever the origins, the Long Orange Dutch carrot, first described in writing in 1721, is the forebear of the orange Horn carrot varieties so abundant nowadays. The Horn Carrot derives from the Netherlands town of Hoorn in the neighborhood of which it was presumably bred. All our modern, western carrots ultimately descend from these varieties. Hypernature avant la lettre.

(via )

1:26pm
Filed under: science 
August 28, 2011

North Island Giant Moa - now known by the binomial Dinornis novaezealandiae. This was the largest of the Giant Moas, and lived at the same time as the first New Zealanders. A large man would have been barely taller than the legs of this terrifyingly strong and fast bird.
Extinct Birds. Hon. Walter Rothschild, 1907.

North Island Giant Moa - now known by the binomial Dinornis novaezealandiae. This was the largest of the Giant Moas, and lived at the same time as the first New Zealanders. A large man would have been barely taller than the legs of this terrifyingly strong and fast bird.

Extinct Birds. Hon. Walter Rothschild, 1907.

(via scientificillustration)

3:09am
Filed under: science 
August 9, 2011
“An experimental, arrowhead-shaped aircraft that could reach blistering speeds of 13,000 mph above the Pacific Ocean is set to blast off Wednesday from Vandenberg Air Force Base, northwest of Santa Barbara,” W.J. Hennigan reports. “To give you an idea of how fast that is: an aircraft at that speed would zip from Los Angeles to New York in less than 12 minutes.”

“An experimental, arrowhead-shaped aircraft that could reach blistering speeds of 13,000 mph above the Pacific Ocean is set to blast off Wednesday from Vandenberg Air Force Base, northwest of Santa Barbara,” W.J. Hennigan reports. “To give you an idea of how fast that is: an aircraft at that speed would zip from Los Angeles to New York in less than 12 minutes.”

(Source: Los Angeles Times, via latimes)

7:24pm
Filed under: science 
August 9, 2011
Japan’s Hayabusa spacecraft captured over Southern Australia during its re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere by Kouji Ohnishi

Japan’s Hayabusa spacecraft captured over Southern Australia during its re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere by Kouji Ohnishi

(Source: kateoplis)

7:23pm
Filed under: science 
August 5, 2011
Bosk’s Fringe-toed Lizard (Acanthodactylus boskianus)

Bosk’s Fringe-toed Lizard (Acanthodactylus boskianus)

(Source: bibliodyssey.blogspot.com, via scientificillustration)

12:37am
Filed under: science